Wednesday, November 16, 2016

What is carotenemia?

Carotenemia is yellowing of the skin resembling jaundice caused by the excess carotene in the blood, most commonly found on the palms, soles of the feet and central third of the face and in the sweat.

Carotenemia does not lead to coloration of the membranes that line eyes, unlike jaundice. The accumulation of β-carotene is not associated with the toxicity character by excessive vitamin A.

This condition is caused by eating too much of certain vegetables and fruits rich in carotene, or is the result of therapy with β-carotene for certain disorders (such as erythropoietic, protoporphyria).

Women who consumed 12 mg or more of β-carotene daily for over 6 weeks by constant munching on foods such as dried green pepper flakes or carrots or by taking ‘tanning pills’ tend to develop carotenemia.

Skin color and fertility return to normal within 2 to 6 weeks after high level of intake are discontinued.

The linear relationship between β-lipoprotein and β-carotene may cause carotenemia in hyperlipidaemia-associated disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, nephritic syndrome and hypothyroidism.

Liver disease may cause carotenemia due to impaired conversion of β-carotene into vitamin A.

Supplementation with high levels of β-carotene when there is alcohol induced liver damage can lead to toxic symptoms.
What is carotenemia?

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